What no one told you about Pakistan
PIA (Pakistan International Airlines) postcard from 1960s showing fawn colour summer uniform and moss green colour winter uniform for airline’s air hostesses designed by famous French fashion designer Pierre Cardin. The photo taken in Paris, France, shows air hostesses standing on Avenue des Champs-Élysées with Arc de Triomphe visible in the background.Mr. Chaudhry Abdul Rashid was the first to stitch this PIA uniform. PIA management sent him to Paris to work with Pierre Cardin and Mr. Pierre Cardin appreciated his work. Since then they are working with PIA. Right now under the name “Rashid & Sons” at Akhter Ali Umar Building,Dr.Daud Pota Road, opposite to Ice Berg, Saddar, Karachi. (via gulestan, karachiite)
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

PIA (Pakistan International Airlines) postcard from 1960s showing fawn colour summer uniform and moss green colour winter uniform for airline’s air hostesses designed by famous French fashion designer Pierre Cardin. The photo taken in Paris, France, shows air hostesses standing on Avenue des Champs-Élysées with Arc de Triomphe visible in the background.

Mr. Chaudhry Abdul Rashid was the first to stitch this PIA uniform. PIA management sent him to Paris to work with Pierre Cardin and Mr. Pierre Cardin appreciated his work. Since then they are working with PIA. Right now under the name “Rashid & Sons” at Akhter Ali Umar Building,Dr.Daud Pota Road, opposite to Ice Berg, Saddar, Karachi. (via gulestankarachiite)

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Pakistan Day (Youm-e-Pakistan) or Pakistan Resolution Day also Republic Day is a national holiday in Pakistan to commemorate the Lahore Resolution of 1940 and the adoption of the first constitution of Pakistan during the transition of the Dominion of Pakistan to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan on 23 March 1956 making Pakistan the world’s first Islamic republic. Republic Day parade by the armed forces is a common celebration for the event. (via sincerely-reebs)

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

umalik:

Multan trip part 2. Apologies for late share… was able to take photographs at the tombs of Shah Shams Sabazwari often confused with Shah Shams Tabrizi (which my cousin corrected me on), Bahaudin Zikaraya and old city.

I know it might sound morbid but the beautiful blue and white pottery design I saw on the graves around the Bahaudin Zikarya tomb has really made me tell my family that I want that on mine whenever the time comes. They do it so elegantly, with a narrow slab of these intricate design and Quranic calligraphy in it.

It is amazing to see how people devote their whole lives travelling and living at such places. So many of them are so confident that everything they have is through these saints. They tie these threads around the grills of the tomb with a hope that whatever they are wishing for will stay there and the Saints will help them get that. But overall the art, design and beauty you find in Multan is amazing - if you thought truck art is the best thing about Pakistan, wait till you get to Multan!

p.s. I need to get back on flickr it has been over a year since I last posted anything there.

previously

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

The English expressions coined in WW1
After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

The English expressions coined in WW1

After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Multan trip: I don’t know why, but Multan has always been this very magical city for me (at least inside my head) and with all the extensive travelling I like to believe I have done - I had never been there before! Finally on this 8-9th February some work took me there and these are some of the things I saw. 

There is a famous Persian saying: چهار چيز است تحفه در مولتان…..گرد وگرما گدا و گورستان (Chahar Cheez Ast Tohfa e Mooltan; Gard, Garmi, Gadda, Gooristan) which roughly translate as "Four things are Gifts of Multan: Dust, Summer, Beggars & Graveyards". Let’s just say that is cent percent true! 

Personally I am not a “shrine and saints” kind of a guy, but there is this certain tranquil aura in the old part of the city that with all the chaotic traffic (it is worse than Lahore by manyfold!) and hassling of beggars you feel so much calm.

It was truly wonderful to be in such an interesting city, will be posting another set of photos tomorrow. (via umalik)

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Shrine of Shah Rukn Alam (via umalik)
More about the building and the saint.
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Shrine of Shah Rukn Alam (via umalik)

More about the building and the saint.

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Traditional shoes from Multan (aka Multani khusa - at Hussain Agahi via umalik)
More details here.
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Traditional shoes from Multan (aka Multani khusa - at Hussain Agahi via umalik)

More details here.

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Beautiful details on the ceiling at this shrine. (at Shrine of Shah Shams Tabrez via umalik)
More details on the Shah Shams can be found here.
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Beautiful details on the ceiling at this shrine. (at Shrine of Shah Shams Tabrez via umalik)

More details on the Shah Shams can be found here.

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Tourism Corporation of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa’s new train service from Peshawar to Attock passes by many historical sites. (complete slideshow)

Tourism Corporation of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa’s new train service from Peshawar to Attock passes by many historical sites. (complete slideshow)

Some pictures from recent trip to Kashmir and the Line of Control (LoC) at Chakothi-Uri dividing the State between Pakistan and India (2-3rd January 2014)

Thankfully now things have improved for better with 4 days of trade taking place between the two countries and one day of visitor exchange. Hopefully one day I will be able to travel without any hassle in my car to Srinagar, drink that awesome salted tea and be back home. (via umalik)

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!