What no one told you about Pakistan

Pakistan Day (Youm-e-Pakistan) or Pakistan Resolution Day also Republic Day is a national holiday in Pakistan to commemorate the Lahore Resolution of 1940 and the adoption of the first constitution of Pakistan during the transition of the Dominion of Pakistan to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan on 23 March 1956 making Pakistan the world’s first Islamic republic. Republic Day parade by the armed forces is a common celebration for the event. (via sincerely-reebs)

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Multan trip: I don’t know why, but Multan has always been this very magical city for me (at least inside my head) and with all the extensive travelling I like to believe I have done - I had never been there before! Finally on this 8-9th February some work took me there and these are some of the things I saw. 

There is a famous Persian saying: چهار چيز است تحفه در مولتان…..گرد وگرما گدا و گورستان (Chahar Cheez Ast Tohfa e Mooltan; Gard, Garmi, Gadda, Gooristan) which roughly translate as "Four things are Gifts of Multan: Dust, Summer, Beggars & Graveyards". Let’s just say that is cent percent true! 

Personally I am not a “shrine and saints” kind of a guy, but there is this certain tranquil aura in the old part of the city that with all the chaotic traffic (it is worse than Lahore by manyfold!) and hassling of beggars you feel so much calm.

It was truly wonderful to be in such an interesting city, will be posting another set of photos tomorrow. (via umalik)

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The inside man: ‘In the police department, truth is stranger than fiction’
“I would say most of it actually happened,” remarked Omar Shahid Hamid serenely, speaking about the contents of his book, The Prisoner, during a reading session at The Second Floor (T2F) cafe on Wednesday.
In his 12 years of service for the Karachi Police, Hamid has seen and done it all — he has been injured in the line of duty, been the target of several attacks and was even bombed by the Taliban in 2010. Though the book’s genre is based on fiction, a dialogue between the author and the audience revealed that it is actually so much more. “There is an element of truth to it,” one of Hamid’s colleagues told The Express Tribune. (complete)
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The inside man: ‘In the police department, truth is stranger than fiction’

“I would say most of it actually happened,” remarked Omar Shahid Hamid serenely, speaking about the contents of his book, The Prisoner, during a reading session at The Second Floor (T2F) cafe on Wednesday.

In his 12 years of service for the Karachi Police, Hamid has seen and done it all — he has been injured in the line of duty, been the target of several attacks and was even bombed by the Taliban in 2010. Though the book’s genre is based on fiction, a dialogue between the author and the audience revealed that it is actually so much more. “There is an element of truth to it,” one of Hamid’s colleagues told The Express Tribune. (complete)

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How the fate of an artist is shaped by art collectors
The business of buying and selling artwork is a fascinating one. The dynamics of the art world have been dictated by the market, and this market constitutes a number of significant art collectors. Just like an accessory sported by an established celebrity becomes popular, items collected by art-loving heavyweights add to their value.
It all depends on where a piece of art finds its home. Throughout the course of time, collectors have lent impetus to the art market and played a major role in the success of many artists.
Nour Aslam, head of South Asian and Contemporary Art at privately-owned British auction house, Bonhams, talks to The Express Tribune about how Pakistani art is trending in the international market. (complete)
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How the fate of an artist is shaped by art collectors

The business of buying and selling artwork is a fascinating one. The dynamics of the art world have been dictated by the market, and this market constitutes a number of significant art collectors. Just like an accessory sported by an established celebrity becomes popular, items collected by art-loving heavyweights add to their value.

It all depends on where a piece of art finds its home. Throughout the course of time, collectors have lent impetus to the art market and played a major role in the success of many artists.

Nour Aslam, head of South Asian and Contemporary Art at privately-owned British auction house, Bonhams, talks to The Express Tribune about how Pakistani art is trending in the international market. (complete)

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Russian marine animals Memo (sea lion), Boris(dolphin), Stephen(Beluga), are performing at Maritime Museum in Karachi. (slideshow)
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Russian marine animals Memo (sea lion), Boris(dolphin), Stephen(Beluga), are performing at Maritime Museum in Karachi. (slideshow)

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East meets West, the classical way
The phrase ‘music has no boundaries’ may sound like an overused cliché but it is one of those rare hackneyed statements that will never lose its meaningfulness. The seven notes that musicians employ to exhibit their art and to woo music lovers fundamentally remain the same no matter which part of the world they’re played in. What Italian classical pianist Marco Giliberti and tenor Mariano Sanfilippo managed to do with sitar player Ustad Nafees Ahmed and his team through their distinct performances at a concert titled ‘Music Without Borders’ at the National Academy of Performing Arts (Napa) on Tuesday evening endorsed the observation that even in its most experimentally ‘fused’ form music can be an experience like no other.
The show started off with Ustad Nafees Ahmed’s rendition of raga kalavati. He was accompanied on stage by Ustad Bashir Khan (tabla). Nafees Ahmed, a Napa’s faculty member, did not take long to get into the groove of the pentatonic scale, playing the softer notes with the kind of feeling that’s required for the raga, nicely supported by Bashir Khan who kept things unfussy and simple. Their synchronization in terms of ending set-pieces was thoroughly enjoyed by the audience. (complete)
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East meets West, the classical way

The phrase ‘music has no boundaries’ may sound like an overused cliché but it is one of those rare hackneyed statements that will never lose its meaningfulness. The seven notes that musicians employ to exhibit their art and to woo music lovers fundamentally remain the same no matter which part of the world they’re played in. What Italian classical pianist Marco Giliberti and tenor Mariano Sanfilippo managed to do with sitar player Ustad Nafees Ahmed and his team through their distinct performances at a concert titled ‘Music Without Borders’ at the National Academy of Performing Arts (Napa) on Tuesday evening endorsed the observation that even in its most experimentally ‘fused’ form music can be an experience like no other.

The show started off with Ustad Nafees Ahmed’s rendition of raga kalavati. He was accompanied on stage by Ustad Bashir Khan (tabla). Nafees Ahmed, a Napa’s faculty member, did not take long to get into the groove of the pentatonic scale, playing the softer notes with the kind of feeling that’s required for the raga, nicely supported by Bashir Khan who kept things unfussy and simple. Their synchronization in terms of ending set-pieces was thoroughly enjoyed by the audience. (complete)

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Pakistan hold nerve to seal historic series win over South Africa
PORT ELIZABETH: Pakistan held on for a thrilling one-run win in the second one-day international on Wednesday to beat South Africa in an ODI series for the first time, making its short-notice tour an historic one.
Pakistan defended its 262 in a rain-shortened 45-over game by the smallest of margins as South Africa fell just short of the nine runs it needed off the last over at St. George’s Park to take the three-game series to a decider.
Pakistan has the chance to be the first team ever to whitewash South Africa at home in an ODI contest in the final game. (complete)
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Pakistan hold nerve to seal historic series win over South Africa

PORT ELIZABETH: Pakistan held on for a thrilling one-run win in the second one-day international on Wednesday to beat South Africa in an ODI series for the first time, making its short-notice tour an historic one.

Pakistan defended its 262 in a rain-shortened 45-over game by the smallest of margins as South Africa fell just short of the nine runs it needed off the last over at St. George’s Park to take the three-game series to a decider.

Pakistan has the chance to be the first team ever to whitewash South Africa at home in an ODI contest in the final game. (complete)

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Foreign palette: Lost in transition
What is the definition of home and belonging for a generation that is growing up global? How do we associate the term ‘homeland’ with migration, exile, diaspora and multi-cultural existence? How valid are notions of loyalty to state, nationality, language, culture and tradition for citizens who are at home in the entire world?
These are the questions that have been raised in the current VM Gallery exhibition in Karachi, ‘Homelands — A 20th Century Story of Home, Away and All the Places in Between’. The show is curated by Latika Gupta, who explores this evolving phenomenon through art productions selected from the British Council Contemporary Art Collection. All the participating artists are British but their focus is not confined just to Britain because as Andrea Rose, director visual arts points out, “The ‘Britishness’ itself is now an increasingly fluid concept, with the capital city, London, home to 300 different nationalities.” (more)
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Foreign palette: Lost in transition

What is the definition of home and belonging for a generation that is growing up global? How do we associate the term ‘homeland’ with migration, exile, diaspora and multi-cultural existence? How valid are notions of loyalty to state, nationality, language, culture and tradition for citizens who are at home in the entire world?

These are the questions that have been raised in the current VM Gallery exhibition in Karachi, ‘Homelands — A 20th Century Story of Home, Away and All the Places in Between’. The show is curated by Latika Gupta, who explores this evolving phenomenon through art productions selected from the British Council Contemporary Art Collection. All the participating artists are British but their focus is not confined just to Britain because as Andrea Rose, director visual arts points out, “The ‘Britishness’ itself is now an increasingly fluid concept, with the capital city, London, home to 300 different nationalities.” (more)

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Zeb Bangesh, Mohsin Hamid, Rashid Rana & @NJLahori on the Irtiqa’s #Art & Societal Development. Wonderful discussion on sexuality, nationalism, identity and pluralism. #log #photos #Pakistan #Lahore #social #culture #history (at Ali Institute of Education, via umalik)
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Zeb Bangesh, Mohsin Hamid, Rashid Rana & @NJLahori on the Irtiqa’s #Art & Societal Development. Wonderful discussion on sexuality, nationalism, identity and pluralism. #log #photos #Pakistan #Lahore #social #culture #history (at Ali Institute of Education, via umalik)

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Khayaal Festival: Cerebral bliss
On a crisp autumn morning, one of the four organisers of Khayaal Festival of Art and Literature, Ayesha Husain, stood in front of a small audience at the Alhamra Arts Council Hall 1 and shared her thoughts on why Lahore needs an alternative social narrative which is positive and all-inclusive.
She explained why she and her colleagues, Zainab Qureshi, Amna Omar and Nuria Rafique-Iqbal came together to form Khayaal Creative Network, stressing the need for preserving Lahore’s and Pakistan’s unique socio-cultural identity. Audience members, while few in numbers, agreed. Meekal Hasan and his troupe of musicians vowed the audience with a soulful rendition of the national anthem and so began an extravaganza that was a much needed balm to the usually intellectually parched social calendar of the city. (more)
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Khayaal Festival: Cerebral bliss

On a crisp autumn morning, one of the four organisers of Khayaal Festival of Art and Literature, Ayesha Husain, stood in front of a small audience at the Alhamra Arts Council Hall 1 and shared her thoughts on why Lahore needs an alternative social narrative which is positive and all-inclusive.

She explained why she and her colleagues, Zainab Qureshi, Amna Omar and Nuria Rafique-Iqbal came together to form Khayaal Creative Network, stressing the need for preserving Lahore’s and Pakistan’s unique socio-cultural identity. Audience members, while few in numbers, agreed. Meekal Hasan and his troupe of musicians vowed the audience with a soulful rendition of the national anthem and so began an extravaganza that was a much needed balm to the usually intellectually parched social calendar of the city. (more)

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