What no one told you about Pakistan
Moody’s puts positive outlook for Pakistan’s economy
“Moody’s decision to revise the outlook on Pakistan’s foreign currency rating is primarily based on a stabilisation in the country’s external liquidity position, supported by the government’s strong commitment to reforms under an ongoing programme with the International Monetary Fund,” the firm said.
Pakistan’s foreign exchange reserves increased to $9.0 billion by the end of June 2014 from a low of $2.9 billion in early February 2014.
The country benefited from a new IMF programme, bilateral assistance and government deals that included the auctioning of 3G and 4G licences. A Eurobond sale in April also raised $2 billion. (more)
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Moody’s puts positive outlook for Pakistan’s economy

“Moody’s decision to revise the outlook on Pakistan’s foreign currency rating is primarily based on a stabilisation in the country’s external liquidity position, supported by the government’s strong commitment to reforms under an ongoing programme with the International Monetary Fund,” the firm said.

Pakistan’s foreign exchange reserves increased to $9.0 billion by the end of June 2014 from a low of $2.9 billion in early February 2014.

The country benefited from a new IMF programme, bilateral assistance and government deals that included the auctioning of 3G and 4G licences. A Eurobond sale in April also raised $2 billion. (more)

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Professor Asim Khwaja is the first professor of Pakistani descent who has been employed by the Harvard University’s prestigious John F Kennedy School of Government. His research centered on issues such as finance, education and political economy among other areas has been featured in prominent publications including The Economist, New York Times,Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, Al Jazeera, CNN and BBC.
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Professor Asim Khwaja is the first professor of Pakistani descent who has been employed by the Harvard University’s prestigious John F Kennedy School of Government. His research centered on issues such as finance, education and political economy among other areas has been featured in prominent publications including The Economist, New York Times,Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, Al Jazeera, CNN and BBC.

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Stakes in Mansha’s profitable power plant up for grabs
Few names inspire more investor confidence in Pakistan than that of Mian Muhammad Mansha, a man known for his ability to turn everything he touches into gold.
Known for turning around loss-making, state-owned entities, the man at the helm of the Nishat group presented the ‘offer for sale of shares’ in Lalpir Power Limited on Friday. Lalpir is an independent power-producing company owned by his conglomerate, which runs an oil-fired power station of a gross capacity of 362 megawatts in Muzaffargarh, Punjab.
The offer for sale of shares consists of 37.9 million ordinary shares – 10% of the total paid-up share capital of Lalpir Power – at an offer price of Rs15 per share (inclusive of a premium of Rs5 per share). (complete news)
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Stakes in Mansha’s profitable power plant up for grabs

Few names inspire more investor confidence in Pakistan than that of Mian Muhammad Mansha, a man known for his ability to turn everything he touches into gold.

Known for turning around loss-making, state-owned entities, the man at the helm of the Nishat group presented the ‘offer for sale of shares’ in Lalpir Power Limited on Friday. Lalpir is an independent power-producing company owned by his conglomerate, which runs an oil-fired power station of a gross capacity of 362 megawatts in Muzaffargarh, Punjab.

The offer for sale of shares consists of 37.9 million ordinary shares – 10% of the total paid-up share capital of Lalpir Power – at an offer price of Rs15 per share (inclusive of a premium of Rs5 per share). (complete news)

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Thirty-seven years in UAE and looking forward to more (By Iqbal Mankani)
I landed in Dubai towards the end of September 1975. That was the time when apart from construction workers, talented young men from Pakistan comprising bankers, insurers, engineers, doctors and other professionals were still migrating from the country in search of greener pastures. Banks and Life Insurance along with several heavy industries had earlier been nationalized by the Bhutto regime leaving behind a large group of talented professionals whose services would be welcome in any country in search of talented manpower, particularly the oil rich kingdom of the Middle East. The Arabs were indebted to Bhutto for teaching them to use their new found oil as a weapon against the West and to face the Western world with dignity and so they were more than happy to reciprocate by offering jobs to Pakistanis in their country. (complete article)

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Thirty-seven years in UAE and looking forward to more (By Iqbal Mankani)

I landed in Dubai towards the end of September 1975. That was the time when apart from construction workers, talented young men from Pakistan comprising bankers, insurers, engineers, doctors and other professionals were still migrating from the country in search of greener pastures. Banks and Life Insurance along with several heavy industries had earlier been nationalized by the Bhutto regime leaving behind a large group of talented professionals whose services would be welcome in any country in search of talented manpower, particularly the oil rich kingdom of the Middle East. The Arabs were indebted to Bhutto for teaching them to use their new found oil as a weapon against the West and to face the Western world with dignity and so they were more than happy to reciprocate by offering jobs to Pakistanis in their country. (complete article)

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Pak-India trade: New routes, bank branches emerge on the horizon
ISLAMABAD: It was the first visit by an Indian commerce minister to Islamabad in three decades  but the firsts did not end there.
The neighbours signed three trade pacts and laid the groundwork for not only opening more land trade routes, but also bank branches in each other’s countries for the first time since their creation.
Representatives of the central banks are scheduled to meet in Mumbai next month to discuss this, said a joint statement issued after the talks. (Complete news item)
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Pak-India trade: New routes, bank branches emerge on the horizon

ISLAMABAD: It was the first visit by an Indian commerce minister to Islamabad in three decades  but the firsts did not end there.

The neighbours signed three trade pacts and laid the groundwork for not only opening more land trade routes, but also bank branches in each other’s countries for the first time since their creation.

Representatives of the central banks are scheduled to meet in Mumbai next month to discuss this, said a joint statement issued after the talks. (Complete news item)


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A vendor sells SIM cards in Rawalpindi on January 14, 2010. Pakistan’s battered economy is showing some signs of improvement with GDP growth expected to rise, a state bank report said January 12, but it warned that the battle against militants remained costly. Rising unemployment and inflation together have increased hunger and poverty among the most vulnerable in Pakistan. — AFP Photo/Behrouz Mehri

A vendor sells SIM cards in Rawalpindi on January 14, 2010. Pakistan’s battered economy is showing some signs of improvement with GDP growth expected to rise, a state bank report said January 12, but it warned that the battle against militants remained costly. Rising unemployment and inflation together have increased hunger and poverty among the most vulnerable in Pakistan. — AFP Photo/Behrouz Mehri