What no one told you about Pakistan
The English expressions coined in WW1
After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)
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The English expressions coined in WW1

After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)

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Remember Humsafar, the drama which took Pakistan by storm and had everyone talking about it? Well after a very long break finally another drama from Pakistan is now making waves in Arab world. MBC has taken up on broadcasting Arabic dubbed version of the drama. Hey there you go catch up with ’رفيق الروح’ [Soulmate]’ if you know Arabic.
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Remember Humsafar, the drama which took Pakistan by storm and had everyone talking about it? Well after a very long break finally another drama from Pakistan is now making waves in Arab world. MBC has taken up on broadcasting Arabic dubbed version of the drama. Hey there you go catch up with ’رفيق الروح’ [Soulmate]’ if you know Arabic.

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In the spotlight - The Sohrab Goth Mandi

Every year thousands of cattle farmers descend on the Sohrab Goth Mandi near Super Highway in Karachi. This year the mandi, which witnesses an inflow of animals worth billions and according to its administrators in the largest in Pakistan, is aiming for the Guinness Book of World Records.

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In the crosshairs: Bilal Lashari on Waar

“This film was not made in a way a film should ever be made,” is something Bilal Lashari often said during the course of this interview. 

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Soundcheck: When Roy’s in Rome…
Globetrotting singer Shehzad Roy was recently in Rome on invitation from Pakistan’s Ambassador to Italy, Tahmina Janjuwa. The Pakistan Embassy in Rome in collaboration with Zètema Progetto Cultura, an agency of Rome’s Municipality, had organised the concert last week in Villa Borghese, the second largest public park in Rome, and was part of La Notte dei Musei (The Night of Museums). The solo show presented Pakistan’s rich heritage — especially its music and poetry — to the Italian audience.

La Notte de Musei is an important event on Rome’s cultural calendar. On the night, a series of events such as concerts, plays and other cultural performances are organised at various locations throughout the city. It was indeed a privilege to have Shehzad Roy perform at one of the most prestigious spots in Rome. The audience included representatives of the Italian government, cultural and media leaders, the diplomatic corps as well as Pakistani and Italian community members. (complete)
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Soundcheck: When Roy’s in Rome…

Globetrotting singer Shehzad Roy was recently in Rome on invitation from Pakistan’s Ambassador to Italy, Tahmina Janjuwa. The Pakistan Embassy in Rome in collaboration with Zètema Progetto Cultura, an agency of Rome’s Municipality, had organised the concert last week in Villa Borghese, the second largest public park in Rome, and was part of La Notte dei Musei (The Night of Museums). The solo show presented Pakistan’s rich heritage — especially its music and poetry — to the Italian audience.

La Notte de Musei is an important event on Rome’s cultural calendar. On the night, a series of events such as concerts, plays and other cultural performances are organised at various locations throughout the city. It was indeed a privilege to have Shehzad Roy perform at one of the most prestigious spots in Rome. The audience included representatives of the Italian government, cultural and media leaders, the diplomatic corps as well as Pakistani and Italian community members. (complete)

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alloanday:

1) Habib Jalib being arrested in Lahore on 12th February 1983 during a Women Action Forum protest against Gen Ziaul Haq’s Hudood Ordinance. (more: dawn.com)

2) Final resting place of the late poet. The inscriptions read:

The one with the ripped collar who just passed this street,

He is the wandering mad everyone calls Jalib.

 &

Now the apathetic people of society can stay in peace,

For those who used to awaken people from slumber are asleep.


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“Bum Phatta” by Ali Azmat, Directed by Jami

Credits
Vocalist: Ali Azmat
Album: Klashinfolk (2008)

Director: Jami
Stylist: Ehtesham @ E Styles
Wardrobe: Munib Nawaz
Make Up: Kamal Ahmad
Producer: Rehan Noorani (Azad Film Co.) (via 
shariques)

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Flashback: Diary of a vagabond (by Samar Mahmood)
Mustansar Hussain Tarar is a man of many shades and a wandering soul who has travelled far and wide. His restless nature made him a man without boundaries. From writing to journalism to acting to anchoring, he tried his hand at everything that came his way. He is also a high-altitude adventurer and explorer. But he likes to introduce himself as a vagabond and a risk-taker.
“I’m not a writer, a columnist, an actor or an anchor. I’m just a vagabond. I do not travel for the sake of writing a travelogue. Rather I travel because of my adventurous and exploring nature. It was because of my mental or physical need that I travelled to so many countries around the globe.
“It all started in 1958 when I was in England for my studies. I was selected by a British delegation for a youth festival in the Moscow University. This provided me with a unique opportunity to go to the Soviet Union, though on a fake passport thanks to the Russians. (Complete article)

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Flashback: Diary of a vagabond (by Samar Mahmood)

Mustansar Hussain Tarar is a man of many shades and a wandering soul who has travelled far and wide. His restless nature made him a man without boundaries. From writing to journalism to acting to anchoring, he tried his hand at everything that came his way. He is also a high-altitude adventurer and explorer. But he likes to introduce himself as a vagabond and a risk-taker.

“I’m not a writer, a columnist, an actor or an anchor. I’m just a vagabond. I do not travel for the sake of writing a travelogue. Rather I travel because of my adventurous and exploring nature. It was because of my mental or physical need that I travelled to so many countries around the globe.

“It all started in 1958 when I was in England for my studies. I was selected by a British delegation for a youth festival in the Moscow University. This provided me with a unique opportunity to go to the Soviet Union, though on a fake passport thanks to the Russians. (Complete article)

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Watch the Taming of the Shrew in Urdu performed at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London
Here’s a bit more about the play.
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Ghazal maestro Mehdi Hassan passes away at 84.

The Shahensha-e-Ghazal and great singing legend of Pakistan, Mehdi Hassan passed away in Karachi on Wednesday after a long period of ailment. Considered one of the most successful ghazal singers of Pakistan, Mehdi Hassan was trained in classical music by his father Ustad Azeem Khan and his uncle Ustad Ismail Khan who were both well respected classical musicians.

Hassan tried different styles of music and there was a time in Pakistan’s film industry when a production was considered incomplete without his voice.

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