What no one told you about Pakistan

Parkour: The other side of Hazara town

Over the last three years, if you happened to pass by a certain empty plot located in Quetta’s Hazara Town, you were likely to spot a group of young boys being mercilessly put through their paces. As boys leaped over a series of obstacles, it was not uncommon for one of them to fall to the ground with a pulled muscle or worse, a bone unable to withstand the pressure, snapping to the sound of boos from a scattered audience. “My mother tells me, ‘We have enough problems as a community and the last thing I want now is to see you bedridden’,” says 17-year-old Ali Muhammad, a member of the Hazara community in the city. 

Read more here.

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Hazara girl from Quetta, Pakistan. Descendants from Genghis Khan’s army. (via universalbeauty)

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Hazara girl from Quetta, Pakistan. Descendants from Genghis Khan’s army. (via universalbeauty)

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Ahmed Siddiq - Sher Khan (2012)


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Antoine Pagis: Around the world in search of an ‘ideal match’

Antoine Pagis, a 30-year-old Frenchman, is visiting Pakistan in his VW van fuelled by two desires: to explore the world and to find ‘Miss Right’.
Pagis has been on the road for two months, having decided on a world tour after waking up one morning fed-up with the drudgery of his daily life. He quit his job at a software company in his hometown of Montbrun les Bain, southeast France, and embarked on his dream trip. “I felt the need to feel alive,” he explained.
He also felt the nagging need to find his perfect match. Marriage and children are on his mind, and Pagis told The Express Tribune he seeks the one true love of his life — something to alert all single Francophile women in Pakistan.
What qualities is he looking for? “I’m a young man. Of course I want her to be beautiful, but it’s very important that she’s also smart,” he said.
Arriving in Karachi, he was pleased with what he saw. He said he was glad to discover that young and ‘modern-looking women’ exist in this part of the world. In Quetta, by contrast, he said he rarely saw women, except for elderly ones or children. (Complete news article)
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Antoine Pagis: Around the world in search of an ‘ideal match’

Antoine Pagis, a 30-year-old Frenchman, is visiting Pakistan in his VW van fuelled by two desires: to explore the world and to find ‘Miss Right’.

Pagis has been on the road for two months, having decided on a world tour after waking up one morning fed-up with the drudgery of his daily life. He quit his job at a software company in his hometown of Montbrun les Bain, southeast France, and embarked on his dream trip. “I felt the need to feel alive,” he explained.

He also felt the nagging need to find his perfect match. Marriage and children are on his mind, and Pagis told The Express Tribune he seeks the one true love of his life — something to alert all single Francophile women in Pakistan.

What qualities is he looking for? “I’m a young man. Of course I want her to be beautiful, but it’s very important that she’s also smart,” he said.

Arriving in Karachi, he was pleased with what he saw. He said he was glad to discover that young and ‘modern-looking women’ exist in this part of the world. In Quetta, by contrast, he said he rarely saw women, except for elderly ones or children. (Complete news article)


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Interact: Your favourite city results

So few weeks back we asked you about your favourite city in Pakistan and you got back to us. From Monday we will be posting picture/video/song from one city per day trying to show what you liked about the place.

Lahore: Home, Activities, Spirit, Passion, Food.
Islamabad: Home, Everything.
Karachi: Everything, Lights, New York of Pakistan/Metropolis.
Quetta: Home, people, 
Rawalpindi: Shopping
Abbottabad: Beautiful 
Murree
Kashmir (Muzaffarabad) 

  1. delightful-dawn answered: Islamabad / Lahore / Muree / Kashmir
  2. sugarandspice92 answered: Rawalpindi! I love the shopping :)
  3. whatifweknew answered: Karachi because it’s the new york of Pakistan
  4. shazlicious answered: Islamabad ….just everything!
  5. renegadeinthemaking answered: Karachi! where the lights are
  6. hanniballectered answered: Abbottabad because its beautiful.
  7. rabiat answered: quetta, cause it’s my home,it’s so small and the people over there make it special for me.
  8. shakattack answered: Lahore - there is so much spirit and passion in the city. And of course, the food is amazing. :)
  9. theultimatenarcissist answered: Lahore, because it’s the only city I’ve known this thoroughly. Wesay bhi, Lahore Lahoye ay! :D
  10. imrunningmymouth answered: Lahore!!
  11. love-tv answered: karachi everything
  12. sumaicaasad answered: Lahore…love all the activity that goes on plus its my hometown..
  13. sowie answered: Islamabad, cause it’s where I grew up and experienced some of the lessons of life.
  14. muqmanii answered: lahore - cause its home

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Wondrous feats: One student’s journey from small-town Balochistan to Harvard University

Located on the outskirts of Quetta, is the barren valley of Mariabad where the Hazara lead slow-paced lives. These tribal people, living in narrow brick huts speckled along the rugged hillside, typically sell loose cloth, sweaters or tea for their livelihood.
Like most poor people, their aspirations rarely go beyond sustaining themselves in this underdeveloped nook of Balochistan. Many of them live and die in Mariabad — unaware of the complex concerns and tremendous pace of life in urban centres like Karachi and Lahore.
But one student — the son of a trader who sold Quaid-e-Azam style caps in Mariabad for a living — dared to tread a radically different path. Karrar Hussain Jaffar transcended the confines of an obscure town in Balochistan, where people rarely educate themselves beyond matriculation, to study at the prestigious Harvard University. His story — a narrative about the wondrous possibilities of equal educational opportunities — is truly inspirational. (for complete news click here and for an equally inspirational video of Karrar and LUMS NOP click here)

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Wondrous feats: One student’s journey from small-town Balochistan to Harvard University

Located on the outskirts of Quetta, is the barren valley of Mariabad where the Hazara lead slow-paced lives. These tribal people, living in narrow brick huts speckled along the rugged hillside, typically sell loose cloth, sweaters or tea for their livelihood.

Like most poor people, their aspirations rarely go beyond sustaining themselves in this underdeveloped nook of Balochistan. Many of them live and die in Mariabad — unaware of the complex concerns and tremendous pace of life in urban centres like Karachi and Lahore.

But one student — the son of a trader who sold Quaid-e-Azam style caps in Mariabad for a living — dared to tread a radically different path. Karrar Hussain Jaffar transcended the confines of an obscure town in Balochistan, where people rarely educate themselves beyond matriculation, to study at the prestigious Harvard University. His story — a narrative about the wondrous possibilities of equal educational opportunities — is truly inspirational. (for complete news click here and for an equally inspirational video of Karrar and LUMS NOP click here)

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A boy who helps his father in his work after school, tries to finish his homework during some free time. (via rabiat, twistednailsoffaith)




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A boy who helps his father in his work after school, tries to finish his homework during some free time. (via rabiattwistednailsoffaith)

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Hanna Lake is a lake near Quetta city in Pakistan and is one of its main attractions. The beautiful Hanna Lake was built in the time of the British Empire in 1894. Golden fish come swimming right up to the edge of the lake. There is a lakeside restaurant with picnic tables shaded by pine trees. At one end, the irrigation dam rises out of the depths like battlements of a fort, and on the eastern part is the well known Hayat Durrani Water Sports Academy. Hanna Lake is very attractive for holidaymakers, and is crowded with hikers and campers in holidays. You can hire a boat and paddle on the lake and round the island in the middle as well as rowing, canoeing, kayaking and sailing.

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Quetta Valley, Balochistan, Pakistan. Baluchi Sheperd by Commoner28th (via pakistanpassion)

Quetta Valley, Balochistan, Pakistan. Baluchi Sheperd by Commoner28th (via pakistanpassion)

Agha Waseem Ahmed: Balochistan’s capital Quetta twinkles at night.
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'Pakistan Through a Lens' showcases a Pakistan rarely highlighted by the mainstream media. Based on the acronym ‘Pakistan’, the show has been divided into eight categories exploring people, places, the dichotomous urban rural life, women, festivals, costume and ideas of nationhood. The collaborative exhibition has been curated by Sadia Malik of 'Destination Pakistan' founded to counter the slanted media coverage of Pakistan. Featuring 25 contemporary Pakistani photographers, the show emphasizes on an ethnically homogeneous, religiously tolerant and culturally diverse Pakistan. The three month long exhibition will continue at Redbridge Museum until 19th June, 2010 and tour different cities in the UK and at a later stage to Pakistan. – (Images: Courtesy of Destination Pakistan and Redbridge Museum)

Agha Waseem Ahmed: Balochistan’s capital Quetta twinkles at night.

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'Pakistan Through a Lens' showcases a Pakistan rarely highlighted by the mainstream media. Based on the acronym ‘Pakistan’, the show has been divided into eight categories exploring people, places, the dichotomous urban rural life, women, festivals, costume and ideas of nationhood. The collaborative exhibition has been curated by Sadia Malik of 'Destination Pakistan' founded to counter the slanted media coverage of Pakistan. Featuring 25 contemporary Pakistani photographers, the show emphasizes on an ethnically homogeneous, religiously tolerant and culturally diverse Pakistan. The three month long exhibition will continue at Redbridge Museum until 19th June, 2010 and tour different cities in the UK and at a later stage to Pakistan. – (Images: Courtesy of Destination Pakistan and Redbridge Museum)