What no one told you about Pakistan
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa – the other side of the picture
 “Gone are the days when law and order would keep the investors away from investment in particular area,” said Raziuddin, CEO of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Oil and Gas Company.
“Chinese are working in Karak, a southern district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa rich with oil and gas. Thanks to video-conference facility, Beijing and Karak are in touch and doing business,” said Mr Raziuddin while talking about the rich oil and gas prospects of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in an event held recently. Security concerns may have been hurdle to the full exploitation of the potential of the area, still 10 companies are working in Southern districts rich with oil and gas, he said.
“Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is not as dangerous as Siberia or other countries in Africa where companies are working in oil and gas fields,” he said.
While he talked of how with just 10 million dollars any one could invest in oil and gas as the KPOGC was going to help with all the formalities, some investors from Gulf already seemed to have started taking interest. (more)
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Khyber Pakhtunkhwa – the other side of the picture

 “Gone are the days when law and order would keep the investors away from investment in particular area,” said Raziuddin, CEO of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Oil and Gas Company.

“Chinese are working in Karak, a southern district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa rich with oil and gas. Thanks to video-conference facility, Beijing and Karak are in touch and doing business,” said Mr Raziuddin while talking about the rich oil and gas prospects of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in an event held recently. Security concerns may have been hurdle to the full exploitation of the potential of the area, still 10 companies are working in Southern districts rich with oil and gas, he said.

“Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is not as dangerous as Siberia or other countries in Africa where companies are working in oil and gas fields,” he said.

While he talked of how with just 10 million dollars any one could invest in oil and gas as the KPOGC was going to help with all the formalities, some investors from Gulf already seemed to have started taking interest. (more)

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Transition: Decorated war hero passes away
Pakistan Air Force’s retired air vice marshal Muhammad Younas, who was awarded Tamgha-e-Basalat after 1965 war, passed away on Monday leaving behind two sons and a daughter.
He was suffering from Parkinson’s disease for the past many years. He was buried at Cavalry ground grave yard.
Muhammad Younas was born in July 24, 1933 in Gordaspur, India and received early education in Jhang.
Talking to The Express Tribune, Rizwan Younas said that his father joined the air force as a sepoy and rose up to the rank of an officer.
Muhammad Younus went to the Royal Air Force Academy in Cornwell and was the first Pakistani pilot to shoot down an Indian spyplane in Rawalpindi on April 10, 1959. He was air officer commanding of Northern Air Command in 1985 during the Soviet war in Afghanistan.
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Transition: Decorated war hero passes away

Pakistan Air Force’s retired air vice marshal Muhammad Younas, who was awarded Tamgha-e-Basalat after 1965 war, passed away on Monday leaving behind two sons and a daughter.

He was suffering from Parkinson’s disease for the past many years. He was buried at Cavalry ground grave yard.

Muhammad Younas was born in July 24, 1933 in Gordaspur, India and received early education in Jhang.

Talking to The Express Tribune, Rizwan Younas said that his father joined the air force as a sepoy and rose up to the rank of an officer.

Muhammad Younus went to the Royal Air Force Academy in Cornwell and was the first Pakistani pilot to shoot down an Indian spyplane in Rawalpindi on April 10, 1959. He was air officer commanding of Northern Air Command in 1985 during the Soviet war in Afghanistan.

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Aitzaz Hasan: Tributes to Pakistan teenager killed when he stopped a bomber
Tributes have been pouring in for a Pakistani teenager who was killed on Monday when he tackled a suicide bomber targeting his school in the Hangu area.
Aitzaz Hasan, 15, was with friends outside school when they spotted a man wearing a suicide vest.
Despite the pleas of his fellow students, he decided to confront and capture the bomber who then detonated his vest, his cousin told the BBC. (news)
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Aitzaz Hasan: Tributes to Pakistan teenager killed when he stopped a bomber

Tributes have been pouring in for a Pakistani teenager who was killed on Monday when he tackled a suicide bomber targeting his school in the Hangu area.

Aitzaz Hasan, 15, was with friends outside school when they spotted a man wearing a suicide vest.

Despite the pleas of his fellow students, he decided to confront and capture the bomber who then detonated his vest, his cousin told the BBC. (news)

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Hazara girl from Quetta, Pakistan. Descendants from Genghis Khan’s army. (via universalbeauty)

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Hazara girl from Quetta, Pakistan. Descendants from Genghis Khan’s army. (via universalbeauty)

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton participates in a meeting with Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, left, and Pakistan Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, right, on the sidelines of the Tokyo Conference on Afghanistan in Tokyo, Japan, on July 8, 2012. [State Department photo by William Ng/ Public Domain, via statedept]
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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton participates in a meeting with Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, left, and Pakistan Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, right, on the sidelines of the Tokyo Conference on Afghanistan in Tokyo, Japan, on July 8, 2012. [State Department photo by William Ng/ Public Domain, via statedept]


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Shahid Afridi to front Pakistan polio fight
Dashing cricketer Shahid Afridi is to front efforts to eradicate polio from Pakistan, going head-to-head with militants who have banned vaccinations in an al Qaeda-linked stronghold on the Afghan border.
The charismatic former Pakistan captain was born in Khyber district, which is part of the militant-infested tribal belt, and campaigners hope his Pashto credentials can persuade parents to inoculate their children.
“It is a noble cause and I am happy to be part of smashing polio from Pakistan which has crippled many children,” Afridi told AFP.
He said the main target was remote areas of Pakistan, such as the al Qaeda and Taliban infested tribal belt on the Afghan border. (complete news)
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Shahid Afridi to front Pakistan polio fight

Dashing cricketer Shahid Afridi is to front efforts to eradicate polio from Pakistan, going head-to-head with militants who have banned vaccinations in an al Qaeda-linked stronghold on the Afghan border.

The charismatic former Pakistan captain was born in Khyber district, which is part of the militant-infested tribal belt, and campaigners hope his Pashto credentials can persuade parents to inoculate their children.

“It is a noble cause and I am happy to be part of smashing polio from Pakistan which has crippled many children,” Afridi told AFP.

He said the main target was remote areas of Pakistan, such as the al Qaeda and Taliban infested tribal belt on the Afghan border. (complete news)


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Pakistan-US relationship illustrated by Zahoor

Glad to see some real mature and witty political caricatures from Pakistan. (via umalik)


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Flashback: When ‘fear’ was a word in the dictionary (By Sher Alam Shinwari)
Syed Amiruddin Shah Gillani hails from a spiritual family; his ancestors migrated from Iran many centuries ago and settled in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, providing spiritual guidance to people. Now in his 80s, he recalls a time when peace prevailed everywhere; there was no violence in the land of the ancient Gandhara civilisation.
“There used to be peace, hospitality; literary and cultural activities. A typical tribal society with hujra and jumaat (mosque) entwined in social norms and traditions that kept institutions and people tied together is now in ruins. The image of a peaceful Pashtun society is smeared with blood and the smoke of bomb blasts everywhere. Tribal life in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has undergone a tremendous change; for Peshawarites, fear was a word that existed only in the dictionary during the 60s and 70s,” Gillani recalls sadly. (complete article) (via umalik)
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Flashback: When ‘fear’ was a word in the dictionary (By Sher Alam Shinwari)

Syed Amiruddin Shah Gillani hails from a spiritual family; his ancestors migrated from Iran many centuries ago and settled in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, providing spiritual guidance to people. Now in his 80s, he recalls a time when peace prevailed everywhere; there was no violence in the land of the ancient Gandhara civilisation.

“There used to be peace, hospitality; literary and cultural activities. A typical tribal society with hujra and jumaat (mosque) entwined in social norms and traditions that kept institutions and people tied together is now in ruins. The image of a peaceful Pashtun society is smeared with blood and the smoke of bomb blasts everywhere. Tribal life in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has undergone a tremendous change; for Peshawarites, fear was a word that existed only in the dictionary during the 60s and 70s,” Gillani recalls sadly. (complete article) (via umalik)


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Afghanistan wants Pakistan to export furnace oil
Afghanistan has asked Pakistan for the first time to allow import of furnace oil to meet the requirement of its power plants.
“The government charges General Sales Tax (GST) on use of furnace in local power plants and Afghanistan will have to pay the same if exports are allowed,” the official said. Pakistan’s furnace oil demand is 9 to 10 million tons per year. Local oil refineries produce 2.5 million to 3 million tons per year while the remaining amount is met through imports. (Source)
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Afghanistan wants Pakistan to export furnace oil

Afghanistan has asked Pakistan for the first time to allow import of furnace oil to meet the requirement of its power plants.

“The government charges General Sales Tax (GST) on use of furnace in local power plants and Afghanistan will have to pay the same if exports are allowed,” the official said. Pakistan’s furnace oil demand is 9 to 10 million tons per year. Local oil refineries produce 2.5 million to 3 million tons per year while the remaining amount is met through imports. (Source)


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Karachi brass art, amidst a hail of bullets

In the midst of violence and chaos in Karachi, master craftsmen are giving birth to art-in brass. Unfortunately, business has taken a down turn in the recent years due to instability in the city.

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