What no one told you about Pakistan

Mar 26

PIA (Pakistan International Airlines) postcard from 1960s showing fawn colour summer uniform and moss green colour winter uniform for airline’s air hostesses designed by famous French fashion designer Pierre Cardin. The photo taken in Paris, France, shows air hostesses standing on Avenue des Champs-Élysées with Arc de Triomphe visible in the background.Mr. Chaudhry Abdul Rashid was the first to stitch this PIA uniform. PIA management sent him to Paris to work with Pierre Cardin and Mr. Pierre Cardin appreciated his work. Since then they are working with PIA. Right now under the name “Rashid & Sons” at Akhter Ali Umar Building,Dr.Daud Pota Road, opposite to Ice Berg, Saddar, Karachi. (via gulestan, karachiite)
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PIA (Pakistan International Airlines) postcard from 1960s showing fawn colour summer uniform and moss green colour winter uniform for airline’s air hostesses designed by famous French fashion designer Pierre Cardin. The photo taken in Paris, France, shows air hostesses standing on Avenue des Champs-Élysées with Arc de Triomphe visible in the background.

Mr. Chaudhry Abdul Rashid was the first to stitch this PIA uniform. PIA management sent him to Paris to work with Pierre Cardin and Mr. Pierre Cardin appreciated his work. Since then they are working with PIA. Right now under the name “Rashid & Sons” at Akhter Ali Umar Building,Dr.Daud Pota Road, opposite to Ice Berg, Saddar, Karachi. (via gulestankarachiite)

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Mar 23

[video]

waj99 asked: Great blog you got here!

thank you!

Mar 08

Sea Shells Exhibiton

We should Sea Shell Exhibition to show what lies on Our Shores and its value

As a Sea Shell collector, you can also add my collection

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RESPONSE: shahwon sea shell exhibition sounds interesting. Can you share some photos so we can see what you really have in mind? - Pakistani

Mar 07

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Feb 24

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Feb 23

“Would you like to curate Pakistani music on this tumblog?” — Get in touch :)

The English expressions coined in WW1
After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)
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The English expressions coined in WW1

After the introduction of conscription in 1916, the distinction between soldiers and civilians became less clear, and vocabulary passed readily from one group to the other. This is the case with a number of words borrowed from Indian languages by the British military in the 19th Century, perhaps the most well-known of which is Blighty. The Urdu words vilayat (“inhabited country”, specifically Europe or Britain) and vilayati (“foreign”, or “British, English, European”) were borrowed by the British in the 19th Century. Both are still used in South Asian English. But it was the regional variant bilayati - rendered as Blighty in English and meaning “Britain, England, home” - which really took off in Britain. Although it was first used during the Boer war, it was not until WW1 that Blighty spread widely and developed new meanings. A blighty wound was a wound sufficiently serious to merit being sent home, and one might also be hit by a blighty bullet inflicting such a wound. Similarly, cushy (“easy, comfortable”) was borrowed from Urdu kusi in the 19th Century, but spread to civilian use only in WW1. (complete)

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Feb 18

[video]

Feb 15

Going the Oxbridge route? Education City piques top ranking universities’ curiosity
Efforts to attract international universities to the proposed Education City near Swabi seem to have proven fruitful, as four more international universities have expressed an interest in opening their campuses.
In addition to the University of Bradford, the University of Cambridge and University of Nottingham from England, University of Pennsylvania from the United States, and Victoria University from Australia have initiated talks with the Higher Education Department (HED) regarding outposts in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (K-P). (more)
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Going the Oxbridge route? Education City piques top ranking universities’ curiosity

Efforts to attract international universities to the proposed Education City near Swabi seem to have proven fruitful, as four more international universities have expressed an interest in opening their campuses.

In addition to the University of Bradford, the University of Cambridge and University of Nottingham from England, University of Pennsylvania from the United States, and Victoria University from Australia have initiated talks with the Higher Education Department (HED) regarding outposts in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (K-P). (more)

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